The Talisman may collect a share of the sales or other compensation from the links on this page. Take advantage of being a student: Use this link to sign up for Amazon Prime Student and get the first six months free. You'll receive products faster with free shipping and access to streaming services and more exclusive deals and discounts.

Editor’s note: This story will be updated as new information becomes available related to the coronavirus COVID-19 in Kentucky. The map of Kentucky COVID-19 cases will be updated as Kentucky Gov. Andy Beshear and the Kentucky state government announce new COVID-19 cases in the state of Kentucky. This story was last updated at 5:00 p.m. on May 22.

The coronavirus COVID-19 has been impacting the world. Close to the Hill, it has resulted in the closure and cancellation of many schools, business, sporting events and recommending social distancing. 

As of May 22, there are approximately 8,426 confirmed cases in Kentucky according to a press conference from the office of Gov. Andy Beshear. Warren County’s total is now approximately 928.

The state total of deaths is 389 — 10 deaths were recorded on May 21 and five on May 22. Beshear said there have been 171,338 tests administered and 3,069 people have recovered from the coronavirus. 

“We now think that we have not just plateaued, but we’re actually in a decline in the overall number of cases, especially when you look at the amount of testing we’re doing,” Beshear said in the press conference. 

“Healthy at Work” is a phased plan “to reopen Kentucky’s economy.” As of May 22, restaurants can reopen at 33% capacity and outdoor seating, and groups of 10 or fewer people may gather.

According to reports by The New York Times as of May 22, Indiana has approximately 31,165 confirmed cases and 1,941 deaths, and Tennessee has approximately 19,089 confirmed cases and 313 deaths.

As of May 20, there are approximately 8,167 confirmed cases in Kentucky according to a press conference from the office of Gov. Andy Beshear. Warren County’s total is now approximately 885.

The state total of deaths is 374 — 20 deaths were recorded on May 19 and 10 on May 20. Beshear said there have been 158,672 tests administered and 2,919 people have recovered from the coronavirus. 

As of May 18, there are approximately 7,935 confirmed cases in Kentucky according to a press conference from the office of Gov. Andy Beshear. He announced 122 new cases from May 17 and 138 new cases from May 18, bringing the total to 260 new cases from the past two days. There were 11 new cases in Warren County on May 17 and 25 new cases on May 18. Warren County’s total is now approximately 828.

Beshear announced 12 new deaths, bringing the state total to 344. He also said there have been 145,238 tests administered and 2,785 people have recovered from the coronavirus.

“Healthy at Work” is a phased plan “to reopen Kentucky’s economy.” As of May 18, government offices and agencies reopen at 50% employee capacity and 33% capacity of the entire facility.

On May 15, Beshear announced four new deaths, bringing the state total to 332. He also said there have been 127,689 tests administered and 2,739 people have recovered from the coronavirus.

On May 14, Beshear announced two new deaths, bringing the state total to 328. He also said there have been 121,246 tests administered and 2,712 people have recovered from the coronavirus.

On May 13, Beshear announced five new deaths, bringing the state total to 326. He also said there have been 117,395 tests administered and 2,649 people have recovered from the coronavirus.

On May 12, Beshear announced 10 new deaths, bringing the state total to 321. He also said there had been 110,609 tests administered and 2,546 people had recovered from the coronavirus.

Advertisement

Beshear did not hold a press conference on May 10, but announced Sunday’s numbers on Monday, May 11. He announced 246 new cases total, 141 coming from May 10, and 105 from May 11. He announced 45 new cases in Warren County, five from May 10, and 40 from May 11. This brings Warren County’s total to approximately 601. He also announced a total of seven new deaths — three from May 10, and four from May 11. The total number of deaths in the state is now 311.

Beshear also said there have been 104,001 tests administered and 2,335 people have recovered from the coronavirus as of May 11.

On May 9, Beshear said there had been 86,900 tests administered. He also said that 2,308 people recovered from the coronavirus. He announced nine new deaths, bringing the total to 304. 

As of May 8, there have been 86,428 tests administered, according to Beshear. He also said that 2,266 people have recovered from the coronavirus. He announced four new deaths, bringing the total to 298.

On May 7, Beshear said there had been 81,391 tests administered. He also said that 2,177 people recovered from the coronavirus. He announced 11 new deaths, bringing the total to 294. One of those deaths was a 73-year-old male in Warren County, the second confirmed death in the county. 

On May 6, Beshear said there had been 78,603 tests administered, according to Beshear. He also said that 2,125 people recovered from the coronavirus. He announced eight new deaths, bringing the total to 283.

On May 5, there had been 61,013 tests administered, according to Beshear. He also said that 2,058 people recovered from the coronavirus. He announced 14 new deaths, bringing the total to 275.

On May 4, Beshear said there have been 60,046 tests administered according to Beshear. He also said that 1,921 people have recovered from the coronavirus. He announced eight new deaths, bringing the total to 261.

On May 3, Beshear said there have been 58,408 tests administered according to Beshear. He also said that 1,892 people have recovered from the coronavirus. He announced zero new deaths on May 3, but there were five from the previous day, bringing the total to 253.

Beshear did not hold a press conference on Saturday, May 2 but he provided a Saturday update on May 3. Along with the five new deaths, he said there were 173 new cases, including 19 in Warren County. 

On May 1, Beshear said there have been 57,648 tests administered according to Beshear. He also said that 1,752 people have recovered from the coronavirus. He announced eight new deaths, bringing the total to 248. 

On April 30, there had been 56,511 tests administered, according to Beshear. He also said that 1,675 people recovered from the coronavirus. He announced five new deaths, bringing the total to 240.

On April 29, Beshear said there have been 54,101 tests administered according to Beshear. He also said that 1,668 people have recovered from the coronavirus. He announced 10 new deaths, bringing the total to 235. Among those deaths he announced the first one from Warren County, a 56-year-old male. 

On April 28, Beshear said there have been 52,411 tests administered according to Beshear. He also said that 1,617 people have recovered from the coronavirus. He announced 12 new deaths, bringing the total to 224.

According to a press release from the Barren River District Health Department from April 28, Warren county has 280 confirmed cases, 47 have recovered and one person has died. This is the first COVID-19 related death in Warren County. 

Advertisement

As of April 27, there have been 48,799 tests administered according to Beshear. He also said that 1,521 people have recovered from the coronavirus. Five new deaths were announced, bringing the total to 213. Beshear also said there is one additional probable case and death due to the coronavirus. 

On April 26, Beshear said 48,474 tests have been administered in Kentucky and 1,511 Kentuckians have recovered from the coronavirus. He also announced three new deaths, bringing the total to 208.

On April 25, Beshear said 46,558 tests have been administered in Kentucky and 1,501 Kentuckians have recovered from the coronavirus. He also announced five new deaths, bringing the total to 205.

On April 24, Beshear said the total number of tests administered is 44,962 and the total number of people recovered is 1,341. He also announced nine new deaths, bringing the total to 200.

On April 23, Beshear said 42,844 people have been tested and 1,335 have recovered from the coronavirus. He also annouced six new deaths, bringing the state total to 191.

On April 22, Beshear said he believes Kentucky has plateaued in relation to new cases each day. He said there have been 36,075 total tests given in the state and 1,311 have fully recovered from the coronavirus. He also announced 14 new deaths, bringing the state todal to 185.

Beshear said on April 21, that there have been 33,328 tests administered in Kentucky, 1,266 have recovered and there are 17 new deaths bringing the total to 171.

On April 20, Beshear said 32,830 tests have been administered in Kentucky and 1,134 Kentuckians have recovered from the coronavirus. 

He also announced six new deaths, bringing the state total to 154. The new deaths by county are a 59-year-old female from Crittenden County, 92-year-old female from Adair County, 64-year-old male from Jefferson County, 85-year-old female from Hopkins County, 62-year-old female from Jefferson County and a 76-year-old female from Jefferson County.

On April 19, Besear announced four new deaths, bringing the state total to 148. Those new deaths are an 85-year-old female from Jackson County, a 61-year-old male from Jefferson, a 94-year-old female from Hopkins County and a 93-year-old female from Graves County.

On April 18, Beshear announced 1,174 people recovered from the coronavirus in Kentucky, 195 more than the previous day. He also announced seven new deaths, bringing the total to 144. The new deaths by county are: a 78-year-old female in Pike County, 95-year-old female in Jefferson County, 96-year-old male in Grayson County, 95-year-old female in Jefferson County, 83-year-old male in Butler County, 85-year-old female in Kenton County, 90-year-old male in Campbell and a 63-year-old male in Jefferson County.

Beshear announced 979 people have recovered in Kentucky on April 17. He also announced eight new deaths, bringing the total to 137. The new deaths include: Two 80-year-old females from Jefferson County, 64-year-old male from Jefferson County, 83-year-old male from Russell County, 93-year-old female from Graves County, 96-year-old male from Russell County, 73-year-old male from Jefferson County and a 49-year-old male from Muhlenberg County.

On April 16, Beshear announced seven new deaths, raising the state total to 129. The new deaths are: a 79-year-old male from Jefferson County, 85-year-old male from Jackson County, 68-year-old female from Jefferson County, 78-year-old female from Adair County, 69-year-old female from Shelby County, 67-year-old female from Graves County and a 92-year-old female from Jefferson County.

On April 15, Beshear announced seven new deaths, bringing the state total to 122. The new deaths are: a 93-year-old female from Jefferson County, 65-year-old male who does not have a county tied to him at the moment, 48-year-old male in Simpson County, 88-year-old female in Jefferson County, 93-year-old female in Jefferson County, 94-year-old female from Hopkins County and an 89-year-old female from Jefferson County.

On April 14, Beshear announced 653 have recovered from COVID-19 and there have been 27,697 people tested in Kentucky. He also announced 11 new deaths, bringing the total to 115. 

Advertisement

“That’s 115 too many,” Beshear said. 

The 11 new deaths include: 84-year-old male in Jefferson County, 61-year-old male in Laurel County, 74-year-old male in Jefferson County, 88-year-old female in Campbell County, 50-year-old female in Adair County, 89-year-old female in Campbell County, 68-year-old male in Kenton County, 87-year-old female in Kenton, 89-year-old female in Jefferson County, 76-year-old female in Lincoln County and an 87-year-old female in Jackson County.

On April 13, he announced at least 629 Kentuckians have recovered from the coronavirus. Beshear also said 26,683 tests have been administered in the state.

Beshear announced seven new deaths, bringing the state total to 104. The new deaths are: 70-year-old female from Jefferson County, 81-year-old female from Muhlenberg County, 84-year-old female from Jefferson County, 67-year-old female from Jefferson County,  70-year-old male from Laurel County, 81-year-old female and an 81-year-old male both from Jefferson County.

Three new deaths were announced on April 12. They are a 72-year-old male in Jefferson County, 74-year-old male in Hopkins County and a 62-year-old male in Pike County. 

Beshear announced four new deaths, bringing the total to 94 on April 11. The new deaths are: 87-year-old male from Boone County, 55-year-old male from Jefferson County, 79-year-old male from Daviess County and a 79-year-old female from Pulaski County.

On April 10, Beshear said 464, which comes to 27%, of Kentuckians who have recovered from the coronavirus. 

He announced 11 new deaths, bringing the total to 90. The new deaths are: 77-year-old male in Butler County, 73-year-old male in Jefferson County, 75-year-old female in Meade County, 76-year-old male in Jefferson County, 75-year-old male in Jefferson County, 75-year-old male in McCracken County, 73-year-old male in Jefferson County, 68-year-old male in Jefferson County, 92-year-old male in Jefferson County, 80-year-old male in Hopkins County and an 80-year-old male in Daviess County. 

Beshear announced six new deaths on April 9, they are: a 69-year-old male from Jefferson County, 83-year-old female from Jefferson County, 70-year-old female from Hopkins County, 59-year-old male from Jefferson County, 82-year-old female from Hopkins County and an 87-year-old female from Jefferson County. 

On April 8, he said there are 339 fully recovered Kentuckians. He also announced eight new deaths. Those eight are: 63-year-old male from Jefferson County, 90-year-old female from Jefferson County, 91-year-old female from Jefferson County, 93-year-old female from Jefferson County, 78-year-old male from Calloway County, 76-year-old male from Christian County, 86-year-old female from Christian County and an 86-year-old male from Christian County.

On April 7, Beshear announced seven new deaths, bringing the total to 65. The new deaths are: 60-year-old male in Jefferson County, 94-year-old female in Lyon County, 85-year-old male in Jefferson County, 70-year-old male in Jefferson County, 42-year-old male in Jefferson County, 72-year-old female in Lyon County and an 83-year-old female in Adair County.

On April 6, Beshear announced 14 deaths, an 86-year-old male in Jefferson County, 96-year-old male in Kenton County, 74-year-old female from Fayette County, 81-year-old male from McCracken County, 56-year-old female from Jefferson County, 85-year-old female from Jefferson County, 81-year-old female from Campbell County, 92-year-old female from Kenton County, 89-year-old female from Kenton County, 74-year-old male from Jefferson County, 63-year-old male from Campbell County, 91-year-old female from Kenton County, 91-year-old female from Kenton County and a 96-year-old male from Boyd County. 

On April 5, Beshear said there are 306 who have recovered from COVID-19.

He announced five new deaths. Three are in Jefferson County: an 80-year-old female, 66-year-old female and a 54-year-old female. The other two are an 85-year-old female from McLean County and a 90-year-old female from Woodford County.

Beshear said there are three new coronavirus related deaths on April 5. The three are a 56-year-old female from Fayette County, 52-year-old female from Bullitt County and an 81-year-old male from Boone County. 

Advertisement

On April 3, Beshear said there are six new deaths, four are in Jefferson County: 60-year-old female, 88-year-old female, 64-year-old male and a 69-year-old male. The other two are an 86-year-old female from Madison County and a 76-year-old female Hopkins County.

On April 2, Beshear said there were11 new COVID-19 related deaths and all but one had other health conditions. He said the new deaths are a 65-year-old male from Fayette, 62-year-old male from Pulaski County, 49-year-old male from Boyd, 70-year-old male from Jefferson, 78-year-old female from Jefferson, 89-year-old female from Jefferson, 88-year-old female from Fayette, 77-year-old male from Fayette, 75-year-old male from Grant, 89-year-old female from Kenton and a 65-year-old male from Jefferson.Beshear announced two new deaths on April 1 — a 60-year-old male in Davis County and a 76-year-old female from Hopkins County. This brings the total deaths in Kentucky to 20.

On March 31, Beshear said there are seven new deaths in Kentucky. Four of them are from Jefferson County: an 87-year-old female, an 81-year-old female, a 74-year-old male and a 66-year-old male. The other three cases are an 88-year-old female from Fayette County, a 74-year-old male from Bullitt County and a Campbell County resident in their 80s. 

On March 30, Beshear said there is an executive order to not travel to other states.

Beshear said while enforcement can be done to enforce the executive order, “the reality is the only way that we’re going to get people doing the right thing is because they agree to, is because they see it as their duty.” 

He also said there are two new COVID-19 related deaths in the commonwealth. An 88-year-old female from Kenton and a 90-year-old female from Sipmson — Beshear said both had other health conditions. 

On March 27, Beshear recommended that Kentucky residents do not travel to Tennessee to avoid the spread of the coronavirus.

During the press conference Beshear said there were two new COVID-19 related deaths. A 75-year-old female from Fayette County and a 77-year-old male from Hopkins County. 

“We haven’t lost two in a day until now,” Beshear said.  

Beshear said Kentucky’s fifth COVID-19-related death — a 75-year-old man — came out of Jefferson County on March 25. 

He said Kentucky’s fourth COVID-19-related death came out of Lexington on March 23 — an 82-year-old woman who had underlying health conditions. 

Beshear emphasized that even if there isn’t a positive confirmation in a particular county doesn’t mean there are no cases in the county.

“This is in every county right now,” he said during the March 23 press conference. “It’s about knowing most people are asymptomatic but can still spread it and making sure that even without a positive confirmation, you are doing what you should do to protect other people.”

Beshear said not all cases have demographics available with them including age, sex or county. 

“All that information on numbers is going to be a little imperfect as we go,” Beshear said.

Advertisement

On the night of March 23, nonessential in-person retailers closed, Beshear said during the press conference. Grocery stores, pharmacies, banks, hardware stores and gas stations will remain open. Auto dealers will still be able to provide repairs and parts and perform services online or over the phone. Kentucky’s primary election has been delayed till June 23.

Sen. Rand Paul’s office said on March 22 that he tested positive for COVID-19. His office wrote in a tweet that he is quarantined and is “asymptomatic and was tested out of an abundance of caution due to his extensive travel and events.” 

“I wish him the best and his family the best,” Beshear said. 

Beshear said on March 21 that Kentucky had its third COVID-19 related death — a 67-year-old male in Anderson County. 

On March 21, Beshear said there was one new case in Warren County and one waiting to be confirmed. This brought the total to four possible positive cases. The new case was a 55-year-old male. 

The second case in Warren County was confirmed on March 19. The new case was announced by the Barren River District Health Department and is an 80-year-old woman. On March 20, Beshear confirmed the case during his press conference. He listed the case as a female in Warren County.

During his press conference on March 18, Beshear said one of the new cases from state lab results is in Warren County — it was the first confirmed case in the county.

He said Kentucky has a second person who’s recovered from the coronavirus. That person is located in Montgomery County.

“We expect to see the coronavirus all over the commonwealth,” Beshear said. 

The first coronavirus-related death in Kentucky was reported on March 16 as a 66-year-old Bourbon County man, Beshear shared during a press conference. 

“There were numerous factors that led to this point,” Beshear said. “The coronavirus was only a factor.”

Beshear said during his press conference on March 19 that Kentucky had a second COVID-19 related death. He said a 64-year-old male from Jefferson County died on March 13. 

The first confirmed case in Kentucky was on March 6. The patient is a 27-year-old female from Harrison county. She has since fully recovered, Beshear said in a press conference on March 13.

“Kentucky, we’re gonna make it through this,” Beshear said.

Kentucky residents can call the state COVID-19 hotline at 800-722-5725 to speak with healthcare professionals at the Kentucky Poison Control Center who can provide advice and answer questions. Visit Kentucky’s Cabinet for Health and Family Services website for more guidance regarding the disease.

Sharing is Caring
Print This Post Print This Post